Reena Ahluwalia Speaks at the Gem-A Conference 2017

Reena Ahluwalia was invited by the Gemmological Association of Great Britain (Gem-A) to speak on 'Diamond Storytelling Through Design & Art'. A topic Reena has spoken extensively about. Reena highlighted need for diamond industry to tell diamond stories that can authentically connect to next generations and their aspirations.

Diamonds already start as nature's art-forms. One thing we have learnt in the diamond and jewellery business is that each generation brings their own challenges and opportunities. Collectively as an industry we must have the vision to not only seek to understand the Millennials, but also the generation that will exert their market power after them. According to Reena, trends may come and go, but stories are truly cross-generational. Stories never go out of fashion. Stories, live on.

Established in 1908, the Gemmological Association of Great Britain, or Gem-A, is the world’s longest established provider of gem and jewellery education. 

Read Reena's speaker's interview for Gem-A

Reena Ahluwalia with Gem-A CEO, Alan Hart. 

Reena Ahluwalia with Gem-A CEO, Alan Hart. 

Gem-A CEO, Alan Hart with Reena Ahluwalia and Alan Bronstein. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

Gem-A CEO, Alan Hart with Reena Ahluwalia and Alan Bronstein. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

Reena Ahluwalia Speaking at the Gem-A Conference 2017.  Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

Reena Ahluwalia Speaking at the Gem-A Conference 2017.  Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

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Chandra Horn, Reena Ahluwalia, John Bradshaw, Richard Drucker at the Gem-A Conference. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

Chandra Horn, Reena Ahluwalia, John Bradshaw, Richard Drucker at the Gem-A Conference. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A

Reena Ahluwalia showing the  Coronet By Reena  spinning diamonds collection to attendees at the Gem-A conference. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A.

Reena Ahluwalia showing the Coronet By Reena spinning diamonds collection to attendees at the Gem-A conference. Image: Henry Mesa, Gem-A.

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Wonderful Mark Cullinan of Cullinan Diamonds (his great grandfather was the owner of the famous Cullinan Mike), is now the owner of Reena Ahluwalia's blue diamond painting. 

Wonderful Mark Cullinan of Cullinan Diamonds (his great grandfather was the owner of the famous Cullinan Mike), is now the owner of Reena Ahluwalia's blue diamond painting. 

Wonderful Mark Cullinan of Cullinan Diamonds (his great grandfather was the owner of the famous Cullinan Mike), is now the owner of Reena Ahluwalia's blue diamond painting. 

Wonderful Mark Cullinan of Cullinan Diamonds (his great grandfather was the owner of the famous Cullinan Mike), is now the owner of Reena Ahluwalia's blue diamond painting. 

 

 

Reena Ahluwalia Speaks At The Tokyo Diamond Exchange

Reena Ahluwalia was invited to speak at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange on 'Diamonds And The Power Of Storytelling'. President of The Tokyo Diamond Exchange, Michio Iwasaki graciously welcomed Reena on her visit to the Exchange and shared insights about the market. The event was well attended by the leading diamantaires and jewelers from Japan. Honorary Dean, Hidetaka Kato was present and appreciated Reena's body of work in diamonds, her jewelry designs and her diamond paintings. Event was beautifully organized by Secretary-General, Yoshiaki Yamaka. Here are some of the highlights from Reena's talk at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange. 

President of the Tokyo Diamond Exchange, Michio Iwasaki with jewelry designer, painter and professor, Reena Ahluwalia. 

President of the Tokyo Diamond Exchange, Michio Iwasaki with jewelry designer, painter and professor, Reena Ahluwalia. 

Reena Ahluwalia talked about the importance of engaging the next generations in the storytelling ability of diamonds and urged members to look beyond the 4Cs. She pointed out the need to understand 'Why' trends happen, and 'Why' do people buy diamonds. This will help in answering the 'What' we need to do as diamond industry to keep the diamond dream going.

Reena Ahluwalia talked about the importance of engaging the next generations in the storytelling ability of diamonds and urged members to look beyond the 4Cs. She pointed out the need to understand 'Why' trends happen, and 'Why' do people buy diamonds. This will help in answering the 'What' we need to do as diamond industry to keep the diamond dream going.

Yosiyasu Simozono, Yuji Hisaga (Tokyo Kiho Co. Ltd.) and Reena Ahluwalia at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange.

Yosiyasu Simozono, Yuji Hisaga (Tokyo Kiho Co. Ltd.) and Reena Ahluwalia at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange.

Sunao Nakao (Nagahori Corporation) and Reena Ahluwalia at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange.

Sunao Nakao (Nagahori Corporation) and Reena Ahluwalia at the Tokyo Diamond Exchange.

Diamonds & Millennials: Understand The WHY & The WHAT Will Be Answered

By Reena Ahluwalia. Blog appeared in GEMKonnect

Reena Ahluwalia speaking at the 'Design Inspirations 2017' seminar organized by the GJEPC.

Reena Ahluwalia speaking at the 'Design Inspirations 2017' seminar organized by the GJEPC.

What are the diamond jewellery trends that are shaping up the North American Millennial market in 2017?  

The Gem and Jewellery Export Promotional Council of India (GJEPC) recently invited me to speak and share my observations on this specific question at their design and trend forecasting annual seminar, Design Inspirations. This year’s topic focused on the challenges and opportunities around designing for the Millennials.

A great deal has already been written about the Millennials, their buying power and behaviour. Rightly so, Millennials now make the largest consumer market for diamond jewellery. According to a report by the De Beers Group, Millennials in the US alone account for over 60 per cent of this generation’s diamond jewellery purchases in the top four markets, namely – the US, China, India and Japan.

I’ll summarize what I said at the GJEPC seminar. Since the diamond jewellery market is too wide a spectrum, I decided to focus on a specific area — the non-bridal diamond trends, a rising star segment for Millennials in the US. The premise of my talk was to question why things trend, what influences and shapes them to become market forces. Truly understanding the why will help answer the what that is needed to appeal to the Millennials and the generation beyond.

One thing we have learnt in the diamond and jewellery business is that each generation brings it’s own challenges and opportunities. Collectively as an industry we must have the vision to not only seek to understand the Millennials, but also the generation that will exert their market power after them...

CONTINUE TO READ MORE: https://www.gemkonnect.com/blog/diamonds-millennials-understand-why-what-will-be-answered

Here are my top five diamond jewellery trends shaping the North American Millennial market in 2017 — Enamel, Geometric, Minimal, Meaningful and Open.    Why do these five specific segments constitute trends? I believe these trends are a reflection of what the US Millennials hold close to their heart — self expression and individuality, their digital identity, shedding excess in the world full of information overload, making deep emotional connections, making an impact through their actions, decisions and pocket.  CONTINUE READING:  https://www.gemkonnect.com/blog/diamonds-millennials-understand-why-what-will-be-answered

Here are my top five diamond jewellery trends shaping the North American Millennial market in 2017 — Enamel, Geometric, Minimal, Meaningful and Open.

Why do these five specific segments constitute trends? I believe these trends are a reflection of what the US Millennials hold close to their heart — self expression and individuality, their digital identity, shedding excess in the world full of information overload, making deep emotional connections, making an impact through their actions, decisions and pocket. CONTINUE READING: https://www.gemkonnect.com/blog/diamonds-millennials-understand-why-what-will-be-answered

Type IIa Diamonds

Type IIa diamonds are the most valued and the purest type of diamonds. They contain either very little or no nitrogen atoms in the crystal structure. White stones are exceptionally colorless and fancy colored diamonds are often found with a brown, purple, blue, or pink tone. They represent only 1% - 2% of all mined diamonds in the world. 

In the world of mined diamonds, Type IIa are so rare that they command a 5% to 15% premium, when they can be found.

One of the most well-known examples is the “Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” (formerly known as the “Krupp Diamond”), a 33.19-carat Type IIA diamond.

Purchased for $300,000 in 1968 by Richard Burton, the ring became one Elizabeth Taylor’s most cherished white diamonds; one she wore nearly every day. Of the ring, she once said, “[It] gives me the strangest feeling for beauty. With its sparks of red and white and blue and purple, and on and on, really, it sort of hums with its own beatific life.”  The Asscher-cut diamond ring recently sold at auction for a whopping $8.8 million.

Other iconic historic Type IIa diamonds include the Koh-I-Noor, Darya-I-Noor, the Archduke Joseph, the Regent, the Agra, The Star of the South, The Winston legacy and the Beau Sancy. Type IIa diamonds also have a famous historic connection with Golconda diamonds mined from the historic Kingdom of Golconda in India.

Reena Ahluwalia holds the Type II A, D-color, 910-carat ‘The Lesotho Legend’, the fifth-largest gem diamond in history. In 2018, the diamond was sold for $40 million. The diamond is from the Letseng mine in Lesotho, a country encircled by South Africa. According to Gem Diamonds, it was the largest diamond to have been recovered from the mine (untill 2018).

Reena Ahluwalia holds the Type II A, D-color, 910-carat ‘The Lesotho Legend’, the fifth-largest gem diamond in history. In 2018, the diamond was sold for $40 million. The diamond is from the Letseng mine in Lesotho, a country encircled by South Africa. According to Gem Diamonds, it was the largest diamond to have been recovered from the mine (untill 2018).

The Pink Legacy, a Fancy Vivid Pink, Type IIA, cut-cornered rectangular-cut diamond of 18.96 carats. This incomparable pink diamond has descended from the Oppenheimer Family. Image: Christie’s / 2018

The Pink Legacy, a Fancy Vivid Pink, Type IIA, cut-cornered rectangular-cut diamond of 18.96 carats. This incomparable pink diamond has descended from the Oppenheimer Family. Image: Christie’s / 2018

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Pear-shaped, Type IIa “Artemis Pink” and Type IIb “Apollo Blue”, Sotheby's + Reena Ahluwalia 'Portal of Dreams' diamond painting.

Pear-shaped, Type IIa “Artemis Pink” and Type IIb “Apollo Blue”, Sotheby's + Reena Ahluwalia 'Portal of Dreams' diamond painting.

The Artemis Pink is a Type IIa, Fancy Intense Pink Diamond weighing 16.00 carats. Image: Sotheby's

The Artemis Pink is a Type IIa, Fancy Intense Pink Diamond weighing 16.00 carats. Image: Sotheby's

Unique Pink, a 15.38 ct. fancy vivid pink diamond, the largest fancy vivid pink pear-shaped diamond ever offered at auction. Image: Sotheby's 2016

Unique Pink, a 15.38 ct. fancy vivid pink diamond, the largest fancy vivid pink pear-shaped diamond ever offered at auction. Image: Sotheby's 2016

The largest D flawless, Type IIa, round brilliant diamond in the world. 102.34 carat. At 102.34 carats, this masterpiece of nature is the rarest white diamond ever to come to the market and the largest, round D colour flawless diamond known to man. The only stone of its kind ever graded by the GIA, the diamond has achieved the highest rankings under each of the criteria by which the quality of a stone is judged. The diamond is D colour; of exceptional clarity (it is completely flawless, both internally and externally); and has excellent cut, polish and symmetry. As with the famous Cullinan I and Koh-i-noor diamonds, which are part of the British Crown Jewels, the stone is part of the rare subgroup comprising less than 2% of all gem diamonds, known as Type IIa. Diamonds in this group are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Image: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) / Sotheby's / 2018

The largest D flawless, Type IIa, round brilliant diamond in the world. 102.34 carat. At 102.34 carats, this masterpiece of nature is the rarest white diamond ever to come to the market and the largest, round D colour flawless diamond known to man. The only stone of its kind ever graded by the GIA, the diamond has achieved the highest rankings under each of the criteria by which the quality of a stone is judged. The diamond is D colour; of exceptional clarity (it is completely flawless, both internally and externally); and has excellent cut, polish and symmetry. As with the famous Cullinan I and Koh-i-noor diamonds, which are part of the British Crown Jewels, the stone is part of the rare subgroup comprising less than 2% of all gem diamonds, known as Type IIa. Diamonds in this group are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Image: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) / Sotheby's / 2018

The largest D flawless, Type IIa, round brilliant diamond in the world. 102.34 carat. Image: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) / Sotheby's / 2018

The largest D flawless, Type IIa, round brilliant diamond in the world. 102.34 carat. Image: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) / Sotheby's / 2018

Dubbed as the 'RAREST WHITE DIAMOND' - Sotheby's 102.34 ct, D Flawless, Type IIa. Was cut from a 425-carat rough mined by the De Beers Group in Botswana. 2018. Image: Nils Jorgensen/REX

Dubbed as the 'RAREST WHITE DIAMOND' - Sotheby's 102.34 ct, D Flawless, Type IIa. Was cut from a 425-carat rough mined by the De Beers Group in Botswana. 2018. Image: Nils Jorgensen/REX

Dubbed as the 'RAREST WHITE DIAMOND' - Sotheby's 102.34 ct, D Flawless, Type IIa. Was cut from a 425-carat rough mined by the De Beers Group in Botswana. 2018. Image: WENN

Dubbed as the 'RAREST WHITE DIAMOND' - Sotheby's 102.34 ct, D Flawless, Type IIa. Was cut from a 425-carat rough mined by the De Beers Group in Botswana. 2018. Image: WENN

THE QUEEN OF KALAHARI - an ultra-rare 342-carat, Type II A, D-Flawless diamond found by Lucara Diamond Corp in 2010 at Karowe, Botswana.

THE QUEEN OF KALAHARI - an ultra-rare 342-carat, Type II A, D-Flawless diamond found by Lucara Diamond Corp in 2010 at Karowe, Botswana.

THE QUEEN OF KALAHARI - an ultra-rare 342-carat, Type II A, D-Flawless diamond found by Lucara Diamond Corp in 2010 at Karowe, Botswana. This magnificent stone was transformed into THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

THE QUEEN OF KALAHARI - an ultra-rare 342-carat, Type II A, D-Flawless diamond found by Lucara Diamond Corp in 2010 at Karowe, Botswana. This magnificent stone was transformed into THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six Type II A diamond jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six Type II A diamond jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six Type II A diamond jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

THE GARDEN OF KALAHARI, a collection of six Type II A diamond jewellery creations by Caroline Scheufele, Chopard. http://www.chopard.com/diary/the-queen-of-kalahari/

Lucara Diamond sold giant Type IIa, 813-ct. Constellation diamond for $63M US in May 2016. Just to put all this in perspective, it is the the highest price ever achieved for the sale of a rough diamond. Image: Lucara Diamond Corporation

Lucara Diamond sold giant Type IIa, 813-ct. Constellation diamond for $63M US in May 2016. Just to put all this in perspective, it is the the highest price ever achieved for the sale of a rough diamond. Image: Lucara Diamond Corporation

At 1109-carat, the "Lesedi La Rona" is the largest gem-quality rough diamond to be discovered in over a century and the largest Type IIa rough diamond in existence today. Image: Lucara Diamond Corporation

At 1109-carat, the "Lesedi La Rona" is the largest gem-quality rough diamond to be discovered in over a century and the largest Type IIa rough diamond in existence today. Image: Lucara Diamond Corporation

At 118.78 carats, the “The Graff Venus” is the world’s largest D-color, Type IIA, flawless heart-shaped diamond. The Graff Venus was cut from a 357-carat rough diamond discovered in 2015 at the Letšeng Mine in Lesotho. Image: Graff Diamonds

At 118.78 carats, the “The Graff Venus” is the world’s largest D-color, Type IIA, flawless heart-shaped diamond. The Graff Venus was cut from a 357-carat rough diamond discovered in 2015 at the Letšeng Mine in Lesotho. Image: Graff Diamonds

At 118.78 carats, the “The Graff Venus” is the world’s largest D-color, Type IIA, flawless heart-shaped diamond. The Graff Venus was cut from a 357-carat rough diamond discovered in 2015 at the Letšeng Mine in Lesotho. Image: Graff Diamonds

At 118.78 carats, the “The Graff Venus” is the world’s largest D-color, Type IIA, flawless heart-shaped diamond. The Graff Venus was cut from a 357-carat rough diamond discovered in 2015 at the Letšeng Mine in Lesotho. Image: Graff Diamonds

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: AP

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: AP

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: Reuters

100.20-Carat, Type IIa, Internally Flawless 'Perfect Diamond' could fetch $25 Million in auction in New York in 2015. Photo courtesy: Reuters

The 100.20-carat "Perfect" diamond during the cutting and polishing process. The original rough weighed more than 200 carats and was mined by De Beers in southern Africa. It took more than a year to study, cut and polish the rough into the 100-carat diamond. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

The 100.20-carat "Perfect" diamond during the cutting and polishing process. The original rough weighed more than 200 carats and was mined by De Beers in southern Africa. It took more than a year to study, cut and polish the rough into the 100-carat diamond. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

The 100.20-carat "Perfect" diamond during the cutting and polishing process. The original rough weighed more than 200 carats and was mined by De Beers in southern Africa. It took more than a year to study, cut and polish the rough into the 100-carat diamond. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

The 100.20-carat "Perfect" diamond during the cutting and polishing process. The original rough weighed more than 200 carats and was mined by De Beers in southern Africa. It took more than a year to study, cut and polish the rough into the 100-carat diamond. Photo courtesy: Sotheby's

The 'Winston Legacy' is the largest white diamond ever to come to auction. The 101.73ct, Type IIa, pear-shaped, D colour, flawless diamond was sold to Harry Winston at Christie's auction of jewels in Geneva on 15 May 2013. Its the "largest of its type" ever offered for public sale. Christies Images Ltd 2013.

The 'Winston Legacy' is the largest white diamond ever to come to auction. The 101.73ct, Type IIa, pear-shaped, D colour, flawless diamond was sold to Harry Winston at Christie's auction of jewels in Geneva on 15 May 2013. Its the "largest of its type" ever offered for public sale. Christies Images Ltd 2013.

World’s largest "flawless" D-color, colorless diamond at 101.73 carat. The stone was recently cut from a rough diamond, weighing 236 carats, that had been found at the Jwaneng mine in Botswana. It took 21 months to polish. The diamond is a Type IIa, less than 1% of the world's diamonds are Type IIa.

World’s largest "flawless" D-color, colorless diamond at 101.73 carat. The stone was recently cut from a rough diamond, weighing 236 carats, that had been found at the Jwaneng mine in Botswana. It took 21 months to polish. The diamond is a Type IIa, less than 1% of the world's diamonds are Type IIa.

D-colour, internally flawless, Type IIa diamond of 56.15 cts. In 2011, sold at auction, and becoming a world auction record for any heart-shaped diamond. Image: Christie's

D-colour, internally flawless, Type IIa diamond of 56.15 cts. In 2011, sold at auction, and becoming a world auction record for any heart-shaped diamond. Image: Christie's

The “Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” (formerly known as the “Krupp Diamond”), a 33.19-carat Type IIA diamond. I had the honor of trying out this legendary beauty at Christie's New York. Memorable moment!

The “Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” (formerly known as the “Krupp Diamond”), a 33.19-carat Type IIA diamond. I had the honor of trying out this legendary beauty at Christie's New York. Memorable moment!

The “Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” (formerly known as the “Krupp Diamond”), a 33.19-carat Type IIA diamond. Purchased for $300,000 in 1968 by Richard Burton, the ring became one Elizabeth Taylor’s most cherished white diamonds; one she wore nearly every day. Of the ring, she once said, “[It] gives me the strangest feeling for beauty. With its sparks of red and white and blue and purple, and on and on, really, it sort of hums with its own beatific life.” The Asscher-cut diamond ring recently sold at auction for a whopping $8.8 million.

The “Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” (formerly known as the “Krupp Diamond”), a 33.19-carat Type IIA diamond. Purchased for $300,000 in 1968 by Richard Burton, the ring became one Elizabeth Taylor’s most cherished white diamonds; one she wore nearly every day. Of the ring, she once said, “[It] gives me the strangest feeling for beauty. With its sparks of red and white and blue and purple, and on and on, really, it sort of hums with its own beatific life.” The Asscher-cut diamond ring recently sold at auction for a whopping $8.8 million.

The Archduke Joseph Diamond. 76.02cts., D color, Internally Flawless, Type IIA. Image: APF

The Archduke Joseph Diamond. 76.02cts., D color, Internally Flawless, Type IIA. Image: APF

Type IIa and connection with Golconda Diamonds.  

A Golconda diamond is a diamond from a specific geographic area within the historic Kingdom of Golconda in India. Diamonds with proven Golconda provenance are of a specific type of rare, pure carbon diamond known as Type IIa. Less than 1-2% of the world's diamonds are Type IIa.

The kingdom of Golconda is situated in India's Deccan plateau. Golconda was a region located between the lower reaches of the Godavari, Wainganga, Wardha and Krishna-Venva rivers, in the present-day states of Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh, central India.

 

Koh-i-noor is one of the most celebrated Indian diamonds and perhaps the best-known. A modified oval brilliant cut, the 105.60 ct diamond is set in Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother’s Crown. This is the name of the platinum crown that was designed for Queen Elizabeth, consort (or wife) of George VI, to wear at the Coronation of her husband in 1937. The Koh-i-noor is now on display in the Tower of London. Photo: Kenneth Scarratt. Courtesy: The Gemmologists, the Crown Jewels. Via GIA

Koh-i-noor is one of the most celebrated Indian diamonds and perhaps the best-known. A modified oval brilliant cut, the 105.60 ct diamond is set in Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother’s Crown. This is the name of the platinum crown that was designed for Queen Elizabeth, consort (or wife) of George VI, to wear at the Coronation of her husband in 1937. The Koh-i-noor is now on display in the Tower of London. Photo: Kenneth Scarratt. Courtesy: The Gemmologists, the Crown Jewels. Via GIA

The Idol’s Eye is a 70.20 ct Very Light blue diamond that has been described as being between and round and a pear shaped brilliant cut It is believed to have originated from the Golconda region. This famous diamond is an early 17th century stone, an antique triangular modified brilliant cut light blue diamond. Named because of the legend that it once formed the eye of a temple statue, the diamond traveled through a number of international collections. Image Via GIA

The Idol’s Eye is a 70.20 ct Very Light blue diamond that has been described as being between and round and a pear shaped brilliant cut It is believed to have originated from the Golconda region. This famous diamond is an early 17th century stone, an antique triangular modified brilliant cut light blue diamond. Named because of the legend that it once formed the eye of a temple statue, the diamond traveled through a number of international collections. Image Via GIA

Famous Golconda Type IIa Diamonds.    Top Row: Hope (Type IIb) | Koh-I-Noor | Darya-I-Noor  Bottom Row: Archduke Joseph | Regent | Sancy    Image created by: Reena Ahluwalia

Famous Golconda Type IIa Diamonds.

Top Row: Hope (Type IIb) | Koh-I-Noor | Darya-I-Noor
Bottom Row: Archduke Joseph | Regent | Sancy

Image created by: Reena Ahluwalia

Famous Type IIa Diamonds.    Shown here: (1) The De Beers Millennium Star | 203.04 carat, (2) The Idol's Eye | 70.21 carat, (3) The Agra | 28.15 carat, (4) The Koh-I-Noor | 105.60 carat, (5) The Cullinan I | 530.20 carat, (6) The Hope (Type IIb) | 45.52 carat. Image created by: Reena Ahluwalia

Famous Type IIa Diamonds.

Shown here: (1) The De Beers Millennium Star | 203.04 carat, (2) The Idol's Eye | 70.21 carat, (3) The Agra | 28.15 carat, (4) The Koh-I-Noor | 105.60 carat, (5) The Cullinan I | 530.20 carat, (6) The Hope (Type IIb) | 45.52 carat. Image created by: Reena Ahluwalia

The 42.52 carat legendary Hope Diamond without it's white diamond pendant. Photo: Chip Clark. Smithsonian. Did you know? The famous Hope diamond was originally 112 carats before being cut to its present weight of 45.52 carats. The Hope Diamond is a Type II (b) Golconda diamond.

The 42.52 carat legendary Hope Diamond without it's white diamond pendant. Photo: Chip Clark. Smithsonian. Did you know? The famous Hope diamond was originally 112 carats before being cut to its present weight of 45.52 carats. The Hope Diamond is a Type II (b) Golconda diamond.

Golconda Diamonds: Rahul Kadakia, Department Head, Jewelry, Christie's Americas, describes these very special and rare diamonds. (2005) (RT 3:13)

The Star of South Diamond. 128.48-carat, Type IIa, fancy light pinkish-brown diamond. It was discovered in 1853 and became the first Brazilian diamond to receive international acclaim.

The Star of South Diamond. 128.48-carat, Type IIa, fancy light pinkish-brown diamond. It was discovered in 1853 and became the first Brazilian diamond to receive international acclaim.

From The Treasury of Baroda - a magnificent three-tired diamond necklace, shown here worn by the Maharani of Baroda, Sita Devi in 1948. Khande Roe, Gaekwar of Baroda, had this necklace made to display two important diamonds - The 128.48-carat, Type IIa, Star of the South (fancy light pinkish-brown) and the 78.5-carat English Dresden below it. Necklace photo: circa 1880.

From The Treasury of Baroda - a magnificent three-tired diamond necklace, shown here worn by the Maharani of Baroda, Sita Devi in 1948. Khande Roe, Gaekwar of Baroda, had this necklace made to display two important diamonds - The 128.48-carat, Type IIa, Star of the South (fancy light pinkish-brown) and the 78.5-carat English Dresden below it. Necklace photo: circa 1880.

The Beau Sancy Diamond. Type IIa, 34.98 ct., modified pear, double rose cut diamond. The stone has passed through four European Royal families. Image: Sotheby's

The Beau Sancy Diamond. Type IIa, 34.98 ct., modified pear, double rose cut diamond. The stone has passed through four European Royal families. Image: Sotheby's


 

 

Esperanza Diamond is a Type IIa, internally flawless, D-color, 4.65-Carat ‘Triolette’, cut by master cutter Mike Botha.

Esperanza Diamond is a Type IIa, internally flawless, D-color, 4.65-Carat ‘Triolette’, cut by master cutter Mike Botha.

118.28-carat, D-color, flawless, Type IIa, magnificent oval diamond. Image: Sotheby's

118.28-carat, D-color, flawless, Type IIa, magnificent oval diamond. Image: Sotheby's

A model holds a 118.28-carat, flawless diamond dubbed the 'Magnificent Oval Diamond' during a media preview at Sotheby's Hong Kong auction house on September 19, 2013. The stone broke a world record on October 7, 2013 when it fetched more than 30 million USD on auction. Photo: Laurent FIEVET

A model holds a 118.28-carat, flawless diamond dubbed the 'Magnificent Oval Diamond' during a media preview at Sotheby's Hong Kong auction house on September 19, 2013. The stone broke a world record on October 7, 2013 when it fetched more than 30 million USD on auction. Photo: Laurent FIEVET

In the past I have authored posts on, Top Ten - Largest Diamonds Discovered In The WorldSplendors of Mughal IndiaThe Magnificent Maharajas Of IndiaMystery & History Of Marquise Diamond CutÓr - Ireland's GoldThe Legendary Cullinan DiamondBejeweled Persia - Historic Jewelry From The Qajar DynastyFamous Heart-Shaped DiamondsType II DiamondsGreen DiamondsRed Diamonds and more. Being a curious artist that I am, over years, I have spent countless hours in self-driven studies on diamond, jewelry history and research. All good stuff, as I have accumulated a great deal of interesting knowledge, something that definitely informs my jewelry design and other artistic creations. I wrote these blogs for simple reason - to share my collected knowledge with all who are interested, so that more can benefit from it. Take a look and enjoy! -- Reena